GRE

 

The Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) is administered by the ETS (Educational Testing Service) in various test center across the US. The scores of GRE are accepted by a number of graduate schools across the US, Canada and many other countries as one of the criteria for assessing your suitability for admissions to programs of study offered by them. A majority of these schools utilize the scores while considering you for merit based grants, fellowships and financial aids for carrying out further studies.


The GRE was significantly overhauled in August 2011, resulting in an exam that is not adaptive on a question-by-question basis, but rather by section, so that the performance on the first verbal and math sections determine the difficulty of the second sections presented. Overall, the test retained the sections and many of the question types from its predecessor, but the scoring scale was changed to a 130 to 170 scale (from a 200 to 800 scale).
GRE Exam Structure.


The exam consists of three scored sections i.e. the Verbal Reasoning section, the Quantitative Reasoning section and the Analytical Writing section. In addition to the scored sections, there may be a section containing trial questions for use in future administrations. Your answers to these questions do not count towards your test's scores.
This exam is generally administered as a computerized test in most of the test centers. However, the paper based exam is offered in areas where it is not possible to conduct the computer based exam. The overall structure of both the versions of the exam is by and large the same. The only variation is in the number of questions asked in Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections and the time allotted for completing each of these sections. The number of questions asked and the time allotted for Analytical Writing section is the same for both the versions of the exam.
A brief description of each of the exam sections is given in the succeeding paragraphs.


Analytical Writing Section
This section of the exam is a test of your ability to express complicated thoughts in a clear, concise and effective manner. This section of the exam requires you to possess critical reasoning skills in addition to analytical writing skills. The analytical writing section of the exam does not test your knowledge of any particular subject except your command over the English language. The student is expected to provide his responses with clarity and objectivity and avoid writing generalized responses. The section consists of two writing tasks: Issue task and Argument task.


For the issue task, you will be presented with two topics and you will have to choose one of them and write an essay in response to the question accompanying it. You will be given 30 minutes to write this essay. The topic presented to you will state an opinion on an issue of general interest. You will be required to write an essay that addresses the issue from your point of view. You are expected to include relevant reasons and examples in support of your views expressed in the essay.You are not given a choice for the argument task in this section of the exam. You will be presented with a topic and you have to critically analyze the statement made therein. You are expected to write an essay that analyzes the line of reasoning adopted by the writer of the statement. Your essay should not present your views on the argument; rather you have to critically analyze the views of the writer. You will be given 30 minutes to write this essay.


Verbal Reasoning Section
This section of the exam is a test of the student’s vocabulary, as he will be required to analyze relationships between the components of sentences. You will also have to recognize and interpret the relationships between words and the underlying meanings. The questions presented to you in the verbal reasoning section of the exam will include passages on a variety of subjects from the fields of Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences. The questions following the passages will test your ability to comprehend and analyze the content given in the passages.The verbal reasoning section of the computer based exam consists of two sections. Each section has 20 questions that have to be answered within 30 minutes. The paper based version of the exam consists of two sub sections in the verbal reasoning section with 20 questions asked in each section. You will have 30 minutes to answer each of these sections.

 

Quantitative Reasoning Section

This section of the GRE tests your understanding of the basic concepts of Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry. You should be thorough with the facts and formulae in order to score high in this section of the examination. The reasoning skills required for solving problems related to the subject areas mentioned above will be tested by the questions asked in the quantitative reasoning section. The questions asked in this section will be related to data analysis and quantitative comparisons.  The quantitative reasoning section of the computer based examination consists of 28 questions that have to be answered in 45 minutes. There will be two sub sections in the quantitative reasoning section of the paper based examination. You will be presented with 30 questions in each section and you will have 30 minutes to answer each of these sections.